Henrik Eiben, Being There, 2015, Sammlung Dominic und Cordula Sohst-Brennenstuhl

Artist Spaces

For the fifth time, the Weserburg is presenting new artists’ spaces in an exciting sequence. The artists are self-confidently opening up their works and concepts for debate. The exhibition accordingly conveys an insight into the diversity and quality of contemporary artistic production, which is impressively mirrored in the collections of the Weserburg – complemented by selected loans. Precisely in the differences, contradictions and encounters that thereby come to light, the artists’ spaces of the Weserburg react to the complexity of experiencing the world today. Several of the total of sixteen spaces were set up by the artists themselves especially for this exhibition. Besides painting, sculpture, photography and a video work, there are installations involving several media, all the way to a room filled by the Scottish artist Susan Philipsz solely with sounds.
Katja Aufleger, Love Affair, 2017 (Videostills). Courtesy of the artist and STAMPA Galerie, Basel © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Katja Aufleger, Love Affair, 2017 (Videostills). Courtesy of the artist and STAMPA Galerie, Basel © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Katja Aufleger’s new video work “Love Affair” can be seen in a fully darkened room. In calm set-ups, a series of lamps gradually switch on, only to be shot in unswerving succession. The shift from charged quiet to sudden destruction, from light to darkness imbues the work with rich symbolic associations. 

Igor Grubić, 366 Liberation Rituals, 2008 – 2009 (Detail), Art Collection Telekom
Igor Grubić, 366 Liberation Rituals, 2008 – 2009 (Detail), Art Collection Telekom

From the Art Collection Telekom come two spaces by Aneta Grzeszykowska and Igor Grubić. Grubić, who lives in Zagreb, presents the photographic series “366 Liberation Rituals.” Through various actions in public spaces, he makes it clear how everyday life can be sensitively disturbed and revealingly investigated by surprisingly minimal interventions. Heroic statues covered in red cloths, for example, point towards the possibility of revolt and make it clear how simple it is to change and cast doubt on customary points of view. 

But there are also various painterly concepts in the exhibition. Works by Henrik Eiben, Ulrich Erben, Karin Kneffel, Sibylle Springer and Philip Taaffe can be brought into fruitful and contrasting relation with each other. This provides impressive proof that, in spite of or perhaps because of omnipresent digitalization, painting has lost almost none of its fascination. Artists from several generations consider it to be an up-to-date, highly relevant form of expression. The presented positions, some of which feature entirely new works on public display for the first time, offer persuasive perspectives on issues and debates concerning aesthetics, society and reflections on the media. 

Karin Kneffel, Ohne Titel, 2008, Miettinen Collection © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Karin Kneffel, Ohne Titel, 2008, Miettinen Collection © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

The installation by the Belgian artist Danny Devos, abundant in its extent, is particularly impressive. Devos has set up a walk-in space consisting of 24 machines that cause machete-like knives to trace out uniform movements. This disturbing work makes reference to the massacre perpetuated by the Manson family, a group of hippies who lived in an authoritarian, communal sect. Their excessive, drug-induced acts of bloody violence etched their way deeply into cultural consciousness. Devos’ striking apparatuses create an unsettling, enduring image that sheds light on the relationship between senseless violence and its treatment by pop culture.

The Collections Lafrenz, Dominic and Cordula Sohst-Brennenstuhl, Christian Kaspar Schwarm, Karin and Uwe Hollweg, the Miettinen Collection, the Art Collection Telekom, the ACT Art Collection / Siggi Loch and further loaners have all contributed to the success of the new artists’ spaces. 

Artists

Katja Aufleger, Abraham David Christian, Danny Devos, Henrik Eiben, Ulrich Erben, Igor Grubić, Aneta Grzeszykowska, Wolfgang Hainke, Karin Kneffel, Marlena Kudlicka, Susan Philipsz, Sibylle Springer, Philip Taaffe, Wolfgang Tillmans, Haegue Yang, Rachel Whiteread.

Marlena Kudlicka, f=different 9/9', 2016, Miettinen Collection, Foto: M. Schneider
Marlena Kudlicka, f=different 9/9', 2016, Miettinen Collection, Foto: M. Schneider

Eröffnung

Donnerstag, 30. November 2017 um 19 Uhr, Eintritt frei.

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